Skip to Main

October 14, 2021

Congresswoman Bourdeaux Highlights Supply Chain Resiliency Legislation During Committee Hearing

WASHINGTON, DC — Today, Congresswoman Carolyn Bourdeaux’s bipartisan Supply CHAIN Act came before the House Committee on Energy & Commerce for a legislative hearing examining policies to strengthen manufacturing and competitiveness for American businesses. The bill, introduced alongside Reps. Robin Kelly (D-IL-02) and Adam Kinzinger (R-IL-16), creates an Office of Supply Chain Resiliency and Crisis Response to prevent future supply chain disruptions and is a part of a larger package of legislation addressing issues facing American businesses. 

Rep. Bourdeaux said, “I am glad the Energy & Commerce Committee is taking supply chain issues seriously by rapidly discussing my legislation to combat supply chain disruptions. With the holiday season looming, it is necessary to recognize the burden faced by local businesses struggling to provide goods for the American people.”

Watch the hearing here.

 

Below are Congresswoman Bourdeaux’s submitted remarks for the House Committee on Energy & Commerce:

“Thank you, Chairwoman Schakowsky and Ranking Member Bilirakis for holding today’s hearing. The COVID-19 pandemic exposed our nation’s vulnerability to supply chain shocks and disruptions and the substantial impact they can have on our economy.

“As I travel around my district and meet with manufacturers and retailers, I hear constantly about the impact of supply chain shocks and disruptions to their businesses. 

“Metcam Metal Fabricators, a company in my district, had to effectively shut down production of certain items for several weeks due to a shortage of titanium dioxide, an ingredient which is in most powder coatings. This pause led to substantial disruptions in Carrier’s Southeastern United States production, illustrating how shocks and disruptions in one part of a supply chain can trickle down and have a much larger impact on the economy as a whole. 

“The negative effects of supply chain shocks and disruptions are not limited to manufacturers. On a recent visit to a Home Depot location in my district, I saw shelves which would normally be occupied by home improvement products sitting empty because of delays in shipping times and disruptions in supply chains. 

“Supply chain issues are increasingly apparent as our economy continues to recover from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, and as that recovery is hindered by shortages of critical components and delays in shipping times. 

“That is why the bipartisan legislation I have introduced with Reps. Kinzinger and Kelly, the Supply Chain Health And Integrity for the Nation (CHAIN) Act is so critical to our nation’s economic and national security. 

“The Supply CHAIN Act would create an Office of Supply Chain Resiliency and Crisis Response at the Department of Commerce. This office would be responsible for mapping, monitoring, and modeling supply chains as well as planning for and responding to supply chain shocks and disruptions for critical goods and services. The goal is to create an office which can coordinate a whole-of-government approach to avoiding and mitigating supply chain shocks and disruptions.

“The Office of Supply Chain Resiliency and Crisis Response would also be charged with producing a Quadrennial National Strategic Plan for Manufacturing and Industrial Innovation, which will guide our nation’s efforts to secure critical supply chains. This report will provide, among other things: insights and recommendations to improve the security and resiliency of supply chains and support the creation of jobs through the growth of American manufacturing; guidance to relevant agencies with respect to critical goods and services, equipment, and technologies which should be prioritized; and recommendations for expanding the sourcing of critical goods and services, equipment, and technology from allies or key partners of the United States.

“It is my hope that the Supply CHAIN Act, and many of the other critical measures being considered by this Subcommittee during today’s hearing, will become law and alleviate some of the supply chain issues we have seen in recent months.

“Thank you, again, to Subcommittee Chairwoman Schakowsky, Ranking Member Bilirakis, and to Chairman Pallone and Ranking Member McMorris-Rodgers for your work on this issue. I look forward to working with you to get the Supply CHAIN Act passed and signed into law.”

 


Background: The Supply CHAIN Act would: 

Create an Office of Supply Chain Resiliency and Crisis Response at the Department of Commerce, headed by an Under Secretary of Commerce.

Goals of the office:

  • Promote the leadership of the United State in critical industries and supply chains
  • Encourage partnerships and collaboration between the Federal Government and industry, labor organizations, and state and local governments; and
  • Monitor the resilience, diversity, security, and strength of supply chains and critical industries

The office could advance these goals by, among other things:

  • Identifying opportunities to reduce supply chain gaps and vulnerabilities
  • Establishing a coordination group (and appropriate subgroups) with private sector partners to plan for and respond to supply chain shocks and support the resiliency, diversity, security, and strength of supply chains
  • Working with existing authorities at the Department of Commerce and in coordination with the Department of State and the United States Trade Representative to promote diversified and resilient supply chains

The office would be responsible for issuing a quadrennial National Strategic Plan for Manufacturing and Industrial Innovation which would include: 

  • Insights and recommendations to improve the security and resiliency of supply chains and to support the creation of jobs through the growth of American manufacturing
  • Guidance to relevant agencies with respect to critical goods and services, equipment, and technologies which should be prioritized
  • Reviews and recommendations for expanding the sourcing of critical goods and services, equipment, and technology from allies or key partners of the United States.

View the one-pager here. 

### 

Rep. Carolyn Bourdeaux lives with her family in Suwanee, Georgia, and represents Georgia’s 7th Congressional District in the 117th Congress. Carolyn is a strong advocate for affordable health care, and economic recovery that puts workers and small businesses first, and investing in her district’s world-class public education system and transportation infrastructure. 

Georgia’s fast-changing 7th Congressional District includes portions of the northeast Atlanta metropolitan area, including portions of Forsyth and Gwinnett counties and cities Peachtree Corners, Berkeley Lake, Sugar Hill, Norcross, Cumming, Lawrenceville, Duluth, Snellville, Lilburn, Suwanee, Grayson, and Buford.